/The Health System of the Future: How Digital Health Technology is Transforming Care

The Health System of the Future: How Digital Health Technology is Transforming Care

Image for illustration purposes only. Source: Modern Healthcare

Summary: Health information and digital technologies can support population health goals, improve consumer experience, and drive insights into health conditions.

Original author and publication date: Dr. Stephanie Allen et al – November 26, 2019

Futurizonte Editor’s Note: Digital health technology can improve health conditions all over the world, according to experts.

From the article:

It might seem that health care systems and challenges are local and unique, but there are more similarities than differences.

Throughout the world, health care systems struggle with affordability, inequitable health care access, uneven outcomes, and increasing demand for services from growing populations with longer life spans.

Health information and digital technologies can help meet these challenges, support population health goals, improve consumer experience, and drive insights into health conditions. We found examples of public and private programs with demonstrated results that offer creative approaches to common problems or lessons for others. In doing so, we begin to see some of the possible features and capabilities for a health system of the future.

Our research found support for Deloitte’s view of the future of health,2 that health care of the future will be different from today in three distinct ways:

Focus on prevention and well-being. With improvements in early diagnosis, technologies to fix health care problems even before they become problems, and the application of behavioral economics to motivate engagement, care will shift to prevention and well-being. We will move away from the concept of “health care.” Instead, health will be seen as a broader notion that incorporates related concepts of mental, financial, and spiritual well-being. Furthermore, care will be organized around consumers’ needs (as opposed to health care organizations’ needs) and most care delivery will take place outside of health care facilities, in people’s homes, work, school, and in the community.

This theme is particularly prominent in case studies from India (ReMiND project) and Chile (AccuHealth). A basic mHealth application has elevated community health worker performance and contributed to significant improvements in maternal and infant health outcomes in India’s rural communities. And a combination of remote monitoring, artificial intelligence (AI), behavioral nudging, and nutritional and psychological support has improved quality of life for people with chronic conditions in Chile.

Interoperable data and platforms. This will give patients, clinicians, and caregivers real-time insights to help with decisions about prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Decision-support tools will improve care efficiency and effectiveness: Technology will relieve clinicians of most administrative tasks, aid with diagnosis and treatment, and provide additional safety checks.

READ the complete original article here.