/The Deepest Deepfake of All

The Deepest Deepfake of All

Summary: “Like most digital technologies, the quality of deepfakes is increasing at an alarming rate, and it is clear that even the most complex deepfake tools will be as easy to use as Instagram filters in the very near future.”

Original author and publication date: Shelly Palmer – October 17, 2021

Futurizonte Editor’s Note: The railroad killed time forcing all of us to adopt a mechanized time. Digital technologies killed truth, forcing all of us to see everything as just an opinion.

From the article:

The interviewer asked, “Is that image real”? There’s no way to tell. “What about this video?” It’s hard to say. “You can’t tell if that’s real or fake either.” No. Not without analyzing it. “Well, what about the prose? Did a human write this sentence?” It’s possible, but it would not surprise me to learn that it was machine generated. “What about the voice in the video?” It’s sonically perfect. I’d say 60/40 it’s a machine, but I’d need to hear a few more sentences to be sure. “So, what you’re saying is that I can’t trust my eyes or my ears?” Yes. That’s what I’m saying. “Is this the end of truth?”

This is an excerpt from a conversation I had with a trade publication columnist last week about deepfakes. We looked at random samples of still images and video clips. We looked at a few paragraphs of text written in various literary styles. And finally, we listened to some spoken-word audio files and a couple of fully mixed soundtracks. The samples were not labeled, and neither of us had seen them prior to the interview. In every case, it was extremely difficult to tell (with certainty) whether the material was manipulated or computer generated or if we were seeing (and hearing) unaltered recordings of human beings.

Like most digital technologies, the quality of deepfakes is increasing at an alarming rate, and it is clear that even the most complex deepfake tools will be as easy to use as Instagram filters in the very near future.


People Believe What They Want to Believe
This is an example of an extremely low-tech use of video manipulation. It required almost no skill to accomplish. It looks and sounds real unless you are shown the original video. Then, it is clear – beyond the shadow of a doubt – that the viral video was doctored and is fake.

When presented with the facts, generally speaking, those who wanted to think ill of Nancy Pelosi were unmoved. Excuses like, “Yeah, but she’s got Alzheimer’s” or “This might be fake, but you know she drinks” or other similar whataboutisms were used to ignore the truth. Unsurprisingly, supporters of the Speaker were happy to learn that it was fake, then angered about the political attack.

This test/focus group/poll was performed numerous times by an uncountable number of pollsters, YouTubers, and TikTokers and even a few reputable journalists. The most important point is that the fake news didn’t change any minds. And, worse, the facts didn’t change minds either.

In very short order, this technology is going to get so good you really won’t be able to tell what is real and what is fake. We are about to enter a world of metaverses, mixed, virtual, augmented, and extended reality. But technology is not going to be the problem. Dogma is the deepest deepfake of all, and facts are no match for dogma.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE