/Our Average Life Expectancy Could Increase to 115 Years Very Soon

Our Average Life Expectancy Could Increase to 115 Years Very Soon

Summary: Scientists believe that the capacity of the human body currently reaches its limits at around 115 years old. But most people fall short of that due to the ailments and vulnerabilities that accompany old age.

Original author and publication date: Liz Stinson – August 18, 2020

Futurizonte Editor’s Note: I keep telling people that life insurance companies sell insurance until 120 years of age and they laugh at me. Hopefully, they will discover it is true.

Image for illustration purposes only. Photo by Jenny Hill on Unsplash
Image for illustration purposes only. Photo by Jenny Hill on Unsplash

From the article:

Humans are born with an expiration date. From the moment of conception, we’re assigned a shared fate — that someday, in some way, we all die. It used to come earlier. In ancient Roman times, people could expect to live 30 to 35 years. By the mid-20th century, life expectancy in the United States had risen to 65 for men and 71 for women. Today, the average American life span hovers around 78 years, though that’s far from the bounds of what is possible.


Scientists believe that the capacity of the human body currently reaches its limits at around 115 years old. But most people fall short of that due to the ailments and vulnerabilities that accompany old age, a fact that has been tragically underscored by the COVID-19 pandemic. But what if it was possible to reach that outer edge? Just think about that delta for a second: 80 versus 115. “That leaves 35 years to realize,” says Nir Barzilai, director of the Institute for Aging Research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and author of Age Later (St. Martin’s Press). Barzilai is part of a growing cadre of scientists studying longevity — why we age, how our bodies break down, how it affects our well-being and quality of life, and what we can do to slow the process.

These scientists believe in a future where interventions will forestall our physiological wear and tear, effectively making us better resistant to age-related diseases and, yes, maybe even pandemics.

Extending life span is rooted deep in the human psyche. Over history, people have chased the illusive goal of living longer through pills, potions, and fountains of everlasting youth. Today, the quest is backed by increasingly rigorous science spurred on by labs and biotech companies. Their goal is to understand the mechanics behind aging on a molecular level so they can slow it. “We thought aging was inevitable, but that’s not true,” Barzilai says. “Aging is quite flexible and can be targeted. We can delay aging, we can stop many manifestations of aging, and in some cases we’ll be able to reverse aging.”

“The main objective is to live healthier longer, and the side effect of that is you tend to live longer as well.”

Last year, according to an IMARC market research report, the “anti-aging” industry was worth an estimated $54.2 billion. Its skin-care formulas and supplements and high-tech treatments (like cryo-saunas, that claim to slow tissue damage with subfreezing liquid nitrogen baths) might have a superficial impact on our bodies, but the real work happens at the cellular level. That’s where scientists are targeting the hallmarks of aging to create therapies that extend “health span.” “The main objective is to live healthier longer, and the side effect of that is you tend to live longer as well,” says David Setboun, president of the Academy for Health & Lifespan Research, a nonprofit organization of researchers focused on longevity.

READ the complete original article here