/OpenAI’s new language generator GPT-3 is shockingly good—and completely mindless

OpenAI’s new language generator GPT-3 is shockingly good—and completely mindless

Summary: The AI is the largest language model ever created and can generate amazing human-like text on demand but won’t bring us closer to true intelligence

Original author and publication date: Will Douglas Heaven – July 20, 2020

Futurizonte Editor’s Note: If AI can be that good without a consciousness, could it be possible that we also lack consciousness? Or perhaps the question is different: how good will AI be once it gains consciousness?

Image for illustration purposes only. Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash
Image for illustration purposes only. Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

From the article:

“Playing with GPT-3 feels like seeing the future,” Arram Sabeti, a San Francisco–based developer and artist, tweeted last week. That pretty much sums up the response on social media in the last few days to OpenAI’s latest language-generating AI.

OpenAI first described GPT-3 in a research paper published in May. But last week it began drip-feeding the software to selected people who requested access to a private beta. For now, OpenAI wants outside developers to help it explore what GPT-3 can do, but it plans to turn the tool into a commercial product later this year, offering businesses a paid-for subscription to the AI via the cloud.

GPT-3 is the most powerful language model ever. Its predecessor, GPT-2, released last year, was already able to spit out convincing streams of text in a range of different styles when prompted with an opening sentence. But GPT-3 is a big leap forward. The model has 175 billion parameters (the values that a neural network tries to optimize during training), compared with GPT-2’s already vast 1.5 billion. And with language models, size really does matter.

Sabeti linked to a blog post where he showed off short stories, songs, press releases, technical manuals, and more that he had used the AI to generate. GPT-3 can also produce pastiches of particular writers. Mario Klingemann, an artist who works with machine learning, shared a short story called “The importance of being on Twitter,” written in the style of Jerome K. Jerome, which starts: “It is a curious fact that the last remaining form of social life in which the people of London are still interested is Twitter. I was struck with this curious fact when I went on one of my periodical holidays to the sea-side, and found the whole place twittering like a starling-cage.” Klingemann says all he gave the AI was the title, the author’s name and the initial “It.” There is even a reasonably informative article about GPT-3 written entirely by GPT-3.

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