/Human Diversity Will Save Your Job From the Robot Takeover

Human Diversity Will Save Your Job From the Robot Takeover

Key Point: One way for companies to address concerns about job security in the age of robots is to expand the conversation about robotization from the three D’s to the four D’s — by talking about diversity.

Original author and publication date: Ayanna Howard – January 12, 2022

Futurizonte Editor’s Note: Will diversity be the limit robots can’t cross? I sincerely doubt it. But it is good to apply the DEI model to highlight “human relevancy”.

From the article:

Robots have long been celebrated as ideally situated to take over society’s most dirty, dull, and dangerous jobs, from robot vacuum cleaners (dirty) to manufacturing robots (dull) to military robots (dangerous). All those roles, of course, were at one point held by people, and people in those functions will continue to be replaced by robots.

But they won’t be alone: Jobs that classically don’t fit into the “three D’s” work category — dirty, dull, and dangerous — are also being eyed as opportunities for robot workers. Many roles are being reimagined and redefined, with technology substituting for human power. They include positions in the rehabilitation field (with the use of wearable mechanical exoskeletons replacing the manual labor of physical therapists) and in the package delivery field (with the use of drones and self-driving cars replacing human drivers). These human-to-robot job transitions are leading many people to worry about their own jobs; thus, it comes as no surprise that there’s been quite a bit of discussion about how robotics and artificial intelligence will affect the future of work and the roles of even more humans.

One way for companies to address concerns about job security in the age of robots is to expand the conversation about robotization from the three D’s to the four D’s — by talking about diversity.

What does diversity have to do with robotics and the future of work? Research has long shown that when humans and robots work collaboratively, they can complement each other’s talents, resulting in task improvements. While the first three D’s all provide reasons for robots to replace humans, the fourth D, diversity, provides the reason for humans to remain in many work processes.

Robots and AI will continue to redefine how and what type of work gets done, and higher cognitive tasks that once required skilled human expertise, whether financial accounting or basic programming, may be taken over by machines. But we humans — in all our diversity of experience, education, and insight — will still be able to specialize on those tasks that are uniquely defined by our own human capabilities.

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