/How Industry 5.0 Will Transform Process Manufacturing As We Know It

How Industry 5.0 Will Transform Process Manufacturing As We Know It

Summary: In the near future, a new wave of cognitive computing applications and infrastructure, collectively known as Industry 5.0, will transform chemical, pharmaceutical and biotechnology manufacturing.

Original author and publication date: Andreas Eschbach – July 13, 2021

Futurizonte Editor’s Note: We are still trying to figure out Industry 4.0 and Industry 5.0 is already here.

From the article:

There is no underestimating the impact that the process manufacturing industry has on society today. Process manufacturing deals with formulas and basic ingredients, as in biotech, pharma and chemical operations (contrasted with discrete manufacturing, which deals with assembled parts and bills of materials). Chemicals are ubiquitous in our automobiles, particularly EVs, and the new light-weight materials used to reduce carbon emissions, windmills and solar panels. On top of this, pharmaceuticals are saving lives with innovative drugs and vaccines.

But in the near future, a new wave of cognitive computing applications and infrastructure, collectively known as Industry 5.0, will transform chemical, pharmaceutical and biotechnology manufacturing, leading to innovations in drug therapies and dramatically accelerating new drug discovery.

These new “smart” applications in Industry 5.0 were made possible through computing design innovations and the evolution of the internet of things (IoT), a pillar of Industry 4.0, which describes the wave of industrial automation affecting manufacturing today.

With the advent of Industry 4.0, the process industry has been redefined with a wave of intelligent applications consisting mainly of cyber-physical systems, in which applications interact via machine to machine. This evolution has been focused on sensors and data that have radicalized production and brought greater transparency to processes, particularly for a single product or batch. 

While their contributions have been many, Industry 4.0 and industrial IoT concepts have their limitations. Traditionally focused on automation, they have only recognized the role of the human factor as simply another component, rather than an integral and creative contributor to the success of the process. Implementing machinery has created fewer problems, but when things do not go as planned, the consequences may be greater. Machines can only deliver what they have been programmed to do. People, however, bring innovation and creativity, particularly in solving anomaly situations in complex and hazardous manufacturing processes.

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