/Giant Lasers Flash-Freeze and Crystallize Water to Reveal Superionic Structure

Giant Lasers Flash-Freeze and Crystallize Water to Reveal Superionic Structure

Futurizonte Editor’s Note: This report is another example that we still don’t fully know or understand what water is, in the same way that another report (posted here yesterday) reveals that we still don’t know what fire is.

Superionic Structure. Source: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Original author and publication date: Brian Wang – May 27, 2019

Scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) used giant lasers to flash-freeze water into its exotic superionic phase and record X-ray diffraction patterns to identify its atomic structure for the very first time — all in just a few billionths of a second.

Superionic ice is a mix of a solid lattice of oxygen and liquid-like hydrogen. This should exist at the heart of Uranus and Neptune.

Using laser-driven shockwaves and in-situ X-ray diffraction, they observe the nucleation of a crystalline lattice of oxygen in a few billionths of a second, revealing for the first time the microscopic structure of superionic ice.

They used six giant laser beams to generate a sequence of shockwaves of progressively increasing intensity to compress a thin layer of initially liquid water to extreme pressures. 

READ the complete original article here.